If you have made a New Year’s resolution for 2015, you are part of the estimated 40% of Americans who have done so. In comparison, roughly 1/3 of Americans watch the Super Bowl. So more Americans make resolutions each year than watch the Super Bowl. Yet despite the good intentions, research conducted by the University of Scranton shows a mere 8% of people actually achieve their New Year’s goals. 

Why?

Well…that’s a topic for another post. 

But it might help to consider the most common New Year’s Resolutions. As documented by USA.gov, three of the most common resolutions among Americans are: losing weight, managing debt, and getting a better job. 

If one of your New Year's resolutions is to find a job or earn a better position, let me help you become one of the elite 8% that actually achieves your 2015 goal. 

Job seeking in the Digital Age requires you to discover, develop and deliver your personal brand to the world. Put simply, your personal brand is your unique promise of value. A strong personal brand can help you land your dream job, earn a promotion, or make a successful career transition. It is what allows you to stand out from all other candidates in the mind of the decision makers or those in your network. 

While there is no shortage to personal branding tools to help you build your brand’s presence online and off, here are 3 of my favorite tools to help you build your personal brand in 2015. 

LinkedIn 9-a-Day

Social media is not, I repeat, NOT a fad. Social media is not going away. Yes, the tools/ platforms of social media will change but the concept of connecting and building relationships online will never fade away. If Facebook falls, market demands will cultivate another platform to take its place. LinkedIn has managed to brand itself as THE professional social network in more than 200 countries. LinkedIn grew from 259 million users in Q3 2013 to 332 million users in Q3 2014. That is more than 28% growth in users in 1-year. 

To help users develop personal brands on their social network, LinkedIn created the 9-a-Day tool. This tool makes creating your profile and building your network uber easy. It is designed to empower you by providing the insights and techniques to get ahead in your industry in just 9 minutes a day. You can customize your 9-a-day plan with the drag and drop features. Once you are satisfied, simply export your plan to your personal calendar (the tool is compatible with iCal, Outlook, and Google). 

According to LinkedIn, they "consulted experts and professionals across the globe, and found that spending just 9 minutes a day, and no more, developing your ‘at work’ brand, could keep you better informed and make you better at what you do. 9-minutes can be slotted easily into your day, and it gives you complete focus."

Link to Tool: http://www.linkedin-9aday.com/

SlideShare Visual Career Journey

When making decisions, we use both rational and emotional thoughts, but research has shown that emotions play the primary role in final decisions. Antonio Damasio, M.D., heads the department of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Antonio’s studies found that, “pure thought untainted by emotion and other "lower" mental functions is less useful than commonly supposed. The brain often "decides" among alternatives by "marking" one alternative as more emotionally salient than another.”

Storytelling is the best way to touch the emotional triggers that inspire someone to make a decision in your favor. Sure you could share statistics, job duties and data points with hiring managers but telling them your story will leave a lasting impression; one that allows you to stand out from the other qualified candidates.

SlideShare partnered with LinkedIn to bring professionals a visual storytelling application guaranteed to give job seeker’s a leg up on the competition. This new app allows even the most technologically inept job seeker to create a visually stimulating version of their career journey with a single click!

Make sure to update your LinkedIn profile completely before creating your visual career journey. Add as much information and multimedia pieces as possible and then create your masterpiece! 

Link to Tool: https://www.slideshare.net/professional-journey

Online ID Calculator

Long before an employer meets you in person, they will meet you online. First impressions in the 21st century consist of what I call “digital handshakes”. This is when a potential employer searches for you online before they meet you for an interview or networking event. Therefore, however Google sees you is exactly how your potential employer or professional contact will see you.

Say you share the same name as a convicted felon. His/her mug shot is now representing your name (your personal brand) online. Granted, this is an extreme example but this does happen. If you don’t show up in a Google search, then you don’t exist. Sad but true. Think about it – how many times have you searched for local restaurants on Google and went to the most favorable option that appeared? How many times did you patronize the restaurants that did not appear? Just like a business, your target audience needs to first know you exist and second believe you can add value to their lives in some way.

The perfect tool to help you proactively manage your personal brand online is the Reach Online ID Calculator. It is free to use and within 5 minutes you have a report that tells you just how strong or weak your online personal brand really is. It even gives you suggestions as to how to improve your online identity, which is rated by your brand’s Volume, Relevance, Purity, Diversity, and Validation within search engine results pages. 

Link to Tool: http://www.onlineidcalculator.com/index.php

Bonus! 21Habit.com

Although the tools listed above are incredibly powerful and can certainly help you build your personal brand in 2015, habit forming will inevitably decide whether or not you are successful in achieving your new year’s resolutions. I’ve found the studies to be true that indicate it takes 21 days to form a new habit, which is why I am recommending you use this tool to form habits that strengthen your online presence in 2015. 

21Habit is a digital motivational coach that emails you each day to remind you of the habit you are trying to form. The email reminders are interactive such that you answer YES or NO to if you completed the habit that day. The tool records your answers and provides a calendar at the conclusion of 21 days that shows how well you stuck to your plan. 

If you are really committed to improving your personal brand in 2015, I recommend using the “Committed Mode”, which is a brilliant concept. According to 21Habit, “you invest $21 towards your 21-day challenge. Each day you succeed you get $1 back. Each day you fail or do not check in you forfeit $1 which 21Habit donates to one of several charities.” Now that’s motivation! 

Link to Tool: http://www.21habit.com/


What’s your New Year’s Resolution for 2015? Keep us posted on your progress. To a productive year ahead! 


Author: Ryan Mickley
 Author: Ryan Mickley, Career Advisor at DeVry University 

Called to cultivate servant leaders, Ryan helps young professionals discover, define and deliver their gifts to the world. He is 1 of 20 Master Certified Personal Branding Strategists worldwide and is the youngest person to ever earn this status. Educational institutions have asked Ryan to speak on topics pertaining to professional development and content marketing, most notably DeVry University, Full Sail University, University of Central Florida and the Drop Back In Academy. With extensive experience in producing informative programs, Ryan has been practicing content marketing for over 5 years. Clients have expressed appreciation for his welcoming demeanor and ability to simplify and explain complex issues, which he attributes to the years he spent in the hospitality industry.

In 2014, Ryan joined the Career Services Team at DeVry University in Orlando, Florida. He serves students and graduates from the College of Business & Management and the College of Media Arts & Technology.

Courtesy of and written
by Jessica Mattison is a freelance writer in Cary, NC. | JobFinderUSA



Using social media to find a job is not for everyone. You have to be passionate about your career goals and ready to work hard at “branding” yourself. You cannot expect to simply create a Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter page and instantly find your dream job—it takes a lot of time and a solid effort.

Begin by retooling your existing social media profiles to reflect a more professional persona. Start with your picture; it should be clean and crisp and the definition of professional. The majority of potential connections and employers will view your accounts and if your profile picture is of you partying with your friends, they will simply move their search along to the next candidate. This same idea applies to everything you post. As a general rule, if you wouldn’t be comfortable with your grandmother viewing it, don’t post it for all to see; that’s what privacy rules are for. After all, you only get one chance at a first impression.

Your profile should include as much professional information about you as possible. Include any major accomplishments, experiences, education, skills, honors, and professional achievements. Basically, build your résumé without actually posting your résumé. Your goal is to draw interest and make a prospective employer want to find out more about you.

Once you have properly updated your accounts, it is time to start networking. “Like” businesses on Facebook and follow professionals on Twitter and LinkedIn. Generate a posting letting everyone know that you are looking for work and specifically what type of work that is. Regular updating is essential and not just any update, it needs to be of valuable, interesting content. If you don’t care about what you are posting, no one else will either.

Find blogs about your industry or create one yourself about something you are passionate about. This will show discipline,—if kept up to date— your knowledge of your field, as well as basic writing and communication skills. Follow others and invite them to join your blog. Also, post links to your blog on all of your social media accounts. The point is to either enter into or create a community of members within your industry to network with.

It should be noted that social media outlets should not comprise your entire job searching repertoire. More traditional methods like viewing job finding websites or papers should also be utilized. You can even follow job finding sites on Facebook and Twitter since they often post new jobs on a daily basis. Social media should aid you in your search, not be the entirety of your search. The chances of getting a job using social media alone are slim, which is why they should be used as tools.

You also need to be careful of tone in your postings. Most people are more confident when posting something online than they are in person. If you come across too impersonal or condescending with prospective employers, you might turn them off and lose out on an interview opportunity.

Using social media does not end once you finally get that promising lead on a possible job opening. Upon receiving your lead, the first thing you should do is look up the company and hiring manager. Most likely, they will have some form of a social media profile if not multiple ones. There is so much you can learn about a company’s culture, hiring process, how they treat their current employees and more that can help you to determine whether or not it is worth it to pursue trying to get an interview. If it doesn’t seem like a good fit with your personality, don’t waste your time on it and just move along; something better will inevitably come your way.

   Really excellent article about Facebook that you should check out...

by Kathy Kristof

The whole social networking phenomenon has millions of Americans sharing their photos, favorite songs and details about their class reunions on Facebook, MySpace, Twitter and dozens of similar sites. But there are a handful of personal details that you should never say if you don't want criminals — cyber or otherwise — to rob you blind, according to Beth Givens, executive director of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

The folks at Insure.com also say that ill-advised Facebook postings increasingly can get your insurance cancelled or cause you to pay dramatically more for everything from auto to life insurance coverage. By now almost everybody knows that those drunken party photos could cost you a job, too.

You can certainly enjoy networking and sharing photos, but you should know that sharing some information puts you at risk. What should you never say on Facebook, Twitter or any other social networking site?

Your Birth Date and Place

Sure, you can say what day you were born, but if you provide the year and where you were born too, you've just given identity thieves a key to stealing your financial life, said Givens. A study done by Carnegie Mellon showed that a date and place of birth could be used to predict most — and sometimes all — of the numbers in your Social Security number, she said.

Vacation Plans

There may be a better way to say "Rob me, please" than posting something along the lines of: "Count-down to Maui! Two days and Ritz Carlton, here we come!" on Twitter. But it's hard to think of one. Post the photos on Facebook when you return, if you like. But don't invite criminals in by telling them specifically when you'll be gone.

Home Address

Do I have to elaborate? A study recently released by the Ponemon Institute found that users of Social Media sites were at greater risk of physical and identity theft because of the information they were sharing. Some 40% listed their home address on the sites; 65% didn't even attempt to block out strangers with privacy settings. And 60% said they weren't confident that their "friends" were really just people they know.

Confessionals

You may hate your job; lie on your taxes; or be a recreational user of illicit drugs, but this is no place to confess. Employers commonly peruse social networking sites to determine who to hire — and, sometimes, who to fire. Need proof? In just the past few weeks, an emergency dispatcher was fired in Wisconsin for revealing drug use; a waitress got canned for complaining about customers and the Pittsburgh Pirate's mascot was dumped for bashing the team on Facebook. One study done last year estimated that 8% of companies fired someone for "misuse" of social media.

Password Clues

If you've got online accounts, you've probably answered a dozen different security questions, telling your bank or brokerage firm your Mom's maiden name; the church you were married in; or the name of your favorite song. Got that same stuff on the information page of your Facebook profile? You're giving crooks an easy way to guess your passwords.

Risky Behaviors

You take your classic Camaro out for street racing, soar above the hills in a hang glider, or smoke like a chimney? Insurers are increasingly turning to the web to figure out whether their applicants and customers are putting their lives or property at risk, according to Insure.com. So far, there's no efficient way to collect the data, so cancellations and rate hikes are rare. But the technology is fast evolving, according to a paper written by Celent, a financial services research and consulting firm.

Source: Ask Sandi | Seminole Voice

What if employment searches were like eHarmony where you each answer a questionnaire and come up with potential matches of who you would possibly be paired up with? No resumes, just an online profile. Interviews would be more like dates, getting to know each other.

That is what networking is all about. It is about meeting people, building relationships, and helping each other to meet your goals. I wish it was as easy as an online search, but it takes more effort than a 40-minute quiz and an online profile. (Although I do know a few people who have met their match on eHarmony.)

Back to the idea of online networking: The best place I can suggest is LinkedIn. I know I have talked about this many times before, but it still stuns me when I find out how many people have not invested the time it takes to get “connected” through LinkedIn.

I have other people who tell me they get lots of requests from Linkedin, but they are not on there. I highly recommend all professional job seekers, including passive job seekers, to put up a profile.

The process is pretty simple, just login to LinkedIn.com and follow the instructions. If you have a good resume, you can copy and paste most of the information. If you would like me to take a look at your profile once you get it online, please send me an email. I would be glad to look at it.


Guest Blogger CFEC Board Member:

sandi14  Sandi Vidal, Executive Director, Christian HELP Foundation, Inc.
  Staff Writer for Seminole Voice

Thinking about starting a job search? Need a little nudge to get going? We’re here to help. Today’s job search may be a bit more complicated than you think. There’s a lot more to it than just searching the internet for jobs and pressing a button to apply; at least there is if you want a better chance for success. So how do you get started? We will share our top 10 ideas on how to jump start your search.
In this webinar, we will outline both new and old methods for your job search. From things like traditional networking to social networking, resumes to online profiles and in-person interviews to video sessions; we’ve got you covered. A successful job search can require a lot of dedication and motivation. We will share our tips on how to make things just a little easier.

By participating in this webinar, you’ll learn:
•The importance of networking and useful tips
•About today’s interview process
•Ways to tune up your resume
•How to incorporate social media into your job search
•Why your personal brand matters


To register, visit: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/10617/106343.

BrightTALK is building professional communities around current and relevant industry and business thought leadership content. Every day thousands of thought leaders are actively sharing their insights, their ideas and their most up-to-date...

Above information was provided by CFEC Board Member and guest blogger:

World of Work Professional
Manpower Florida

(repost for upcoming job fair) By #1 Best-Selling Author and Recruiter Scott Vedder

It’s always best to customize your résumé and explain exactly how your experience has prepared you for the specific qualifications listed in a job posting.  That’s a key point I teach in my best-selling book, Signs of a Great Résumé.  But what should you do when you’re attending a job fair where you’ll meet with lots of different employers?  In a job fair setting, employers will know it’s nearly impossible for you to customize a cover letter and résumé for every single company in attendance.   To quantify what makes you a great candidate for several prospective employers, you should showcase examples of your accomplishments and skills related to the most common requirements in your field.

Before you write your job fair résumé, search for online job postings roles related to the career you’re pursuing.  Take a look at the qualifications that different companies require.  You’ll likely find some common trends and frequently used terms which appear in job postings at several different companies.  With this bit of research, you’ll be able to write a résumé that speaks for itself and a cover letter which addresses your qualifications to fulfill the most common needs of your desired career field.

Next, before going to the job fair, try to determine which companies will be represented.  Take a look at the jobs these companies already have posted on their web sites.  If there’s a specific opening for which you’d like to apply, customize a separate résumé and cover letter for that posting and bring it with you along with your job fair résumé.  If there’s not one particular opening that appeals to you, consider how that company generally evaluates prospective candidates.  What key words do they use in their job postings?  What types of skills and leadership attributes do they value?  What can you learn about their corporate culture and business priorities from their web site?  Then customize a résumé for that company with those ideas in mind.

Consider making a list of the companies you know you want to approach at the job fair and write a customized cover letter for those prospective employers.   Your cover letter should explain why you want to work for that specific company and can also indicate the general field for which you’re interested in applying.  When you submit a customized cover letter with your job fair résumé, you’ll stand out from your competition.  Remember, most other applicants, if they submit a cover letter at all, will be handing over form letters written “To Whom it May Concern,” and not to a specific employer.

In your job fair résumé and cover letters, be sure you use specific examples to quantify what makes you a great candidate in your field.  Whether you’re attending a job fair or you’re applying for a single position, your résumé should always be full of !@$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé. 

! - Any part of your experience that was "amazing!"

@ - Defining points, places, dates and things in your experience

# - Numbers that quantify and prove your past successes

$ - The dollar value of your contributions

% - Figures that easily show growth and results

When you write a résumé that’s full of !@$%, your résumé will speak for itself and you’ll be on your way to a successful job fair!

Scott Vedder is a Fortune 100 recruiter and the author of the #1 best-selling résumé book, Signs of a Great Résumé.  Scott has taught thousands of students and job seekers in résumé workshops at high schools, colleges, universities and non-profit organizations across the country.  Scott’s book has been endorsed as “Recommended Reading” by groups including the Central Florida Employment Council and the Central Florida Jobs Initiative. Scott has been recognized by the Society for Human Resource Management and has been featured as a career expert in nationally-syndicated newspaper columns, on international blogs and in dozens of live interviews on radio programs and television news.  For free résumé and interview tips, visit http://scottvedder.com/freestuff.html

Whether you’re a hiring manager, employer, looking for your next opportunity or currently employed, the talent shortage affects everyone in the U.S. workforce.

Results of ManpowerGroup’s ninth annual Talent Shortage Survey look at the extent to which employers are having difficulty finding the right talent, which jobs are the most difficult to fill, and subsequently, where you’ll find the most opportunity if you’re looking for a new job.

ManpowerGroup's Talent Shortage Survey identified the 2014 top 10 most difficult jobs for employers to fill.
1.            Skilled Trade Workers
2.            Restaurant and Hotel Staff
3.            Sales Representatives
4.            Teachers
5.            Drivers
6.            Accounting and Finance Staff
7.            Laborers
8.            IT Staff
9.            Engineers
10.          Nurses





This report was recommended by CFEC Board Member:

Lisa Hancock, Manpower

Find an office near you or search jobs with www.us.manpower.com

If you are unemployed and looking for a pathway to the future, HBI’s trades skill training is for you....

HBI is a national leader for career training in the building trades. HBI graduates earn a certificate that proves to employers that they have skills they need to be successful on the job.

HBI Offers:

             Training in OSHA 10 safety, construction tools and materials, green building, and industry basics.

             Links to possible internships with employers in the building industry.

             Building trades training from journey-level instructors

             Career counseling and assistance with job placement

Classes are available in Orange, Osceola, Lake and Seminole counties.

For more information about classes in your area contact Robert Harman at 407-607-9174 or . HBI.org

By Scott Vedder - #1 Best-Selling Author and Résumé Expert

April 13th marks the 271st birthday of Thomas Jefferson. Often called the "Father of the Declaration of Independence," Jefferson gave some fatherly advice to his granddaughter including the famous quote, "Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today."  That's also great advice for job seekers.  The best time to start writing a résumé is today.

Don't put off writing your résumé until you see your dream job posted tomorrow... or the next day, or next week!  Today is the best day to start writing a résumé full of !@#$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé

! - Any part of your experience that was “amazing!”

@ - Defining points, places, dates and things in your career

# - Numbers that quantify and prove your past successes

$ - The dollar value of your contributions

% - Figures that easily show growth and results

It is critical that you customize your résumé for each job application.  However, you can start writing your résumé today, beginning with your core skills and most significant accomplishments. Then you can customize it to directly align to the qualifications listed in each job posting.

For example, Thomas Jefferson may have started writing his Summary of Qualifications by highlighting his outstanding written and verbal communication skills.  We hold the truth that he was a great communicator to be self-evident.  And in addition to writing the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson’s résumé would surely include the fact that he spoke four or five languages!

If TJ started writing a résumé to apply for a leadership role in government land acquisition, he’d likely describe one of his most significant accomplishments, the Louisiana Purchase, using !@#$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé.  Perhaps he’d write:

"Increased the size of the continental United States by nearly 100% through the $15 million purchase of 828,000 square miles of land."

That’s certainly an “amazing!” achievement which is explained and quantified with lots of !@#$%.  If Jefferson applied for a position where the job posting also required experience negotiating international treaties he could customize the statement on his résumé to match the posting:

"Negotiated an international treaty to increase the size of the continental United States by nearly 100% through the $15 million purchase of 828,000 square miles of land."

By customizing his résumé based on the job posting and using !@#$%, Thomas Jefferson would be writing a résumé that speaks for itself.

From the early days of the militia that won the American Revolution to today's modern military, Americans have enjoyed life, liberty and a pursuit of happiness thanks in large part to the brave military men and women who have proudly served our country.  I'm sure Thomas Jefferson and all of our Founding Fathers would encourage you to support our nation's veterans.  Jefferson did his part to prepare and support our service members when he signed the Military Peace Establishment Act to create the United States Military Academy at West Point.  One way you can support our nation's military veterans today is to join our Indiegogo campaign to help 2,000 veterans, transitioning service member and military spouses get to work.  You can send deserving veterans a copy of Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition and help them find a great new job in the civilian sector.  Don’t put it off until tomorrow, contribute today.

Jefferson loved to read.  In a letter written in 1809, Jefferson said "I have often thought that nothing would do more extensive good at small expense than the establishment of a small circulating library in every county, to consist of a few well-chosen books."  I'm grateful that the Central Florida Employment Council has identified a few "well chosen" books to help job seekers and has recognized Signs of a Great Résumé and Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition as recommended reading.

In an 1815 letter to John Adams, Jefferson said "I cannot live without books."  When you write a résumé that's full of !@#$%, you'll wonder how your résumé ever lived without at least one book... Signs of a Great Résumé.

Scott Vedder is a Fortune 100 recruiter and author of the #1 best-selling book, Signs of a Great Résumé and Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition.   Scott has been recognized by the White House and Pentagon as an expert on veteran résumés.  He’s taught thousands job seekers in résumé workshops at colleges, universities, conferences, veteran service organizations, military installations and non-profits across the country.  Scott has been featured as a career expert in national and international media. For free résumé and interview tips, visit http://www.authorscottvedder.com/free-stuff-.html.

5,647 was the number of applications I had submitted online, or at least that is how many it felt like. Fresh out of college and ready to start my career, I was in a new city and felt like I was banging my head against the wall searching for a job. Surely my spray and pray application method would pay off eventually, right? I did have a college degree after all. After several months of job searching without much traction, I stumbled upon the silver bullet of the job search: the informational interview. Whether you are just starting your career, like I was, are considering a new field, or are just seeking out a job, the informational interview is a great step to succeeding in your search.

             My strategy for conducting the informational interview was four-fold. First, have a compelling reason for meeting with the person you contact. I was a recent college graduate who had just moved to the area and was interested in learning more about the local nonprofit sector. Your situation may be different than mine, but that does not mean you do not have a unique reason as to why someone should sit down with you. Maybe you are interested in learning more about a specific field or want to find out what it takes to be in your new contact’s position. Whatever it is, do not make it about the fact that you are job searching. Let that fact come out naturally. Mentioning it before you have even sat down will tie the person’s hands and make it tough to get appointments with people.

             Second, keep it short. Only ask for 15 to 20 minutes of their time and was sure to keep that promise during the meeting. If the meeting goes longer, make sure it is on their terms and not because you forgot to keep an eye on the time. People are busy, so asking for only 15 to 20 minutes of their time makes it more manageable for them and more likely that they will meet with you.

             Third, ask questions about them. Do not make it about yourself. You are there to find out more about them, their background, and the field they are in. Listening is an excellent skill to develop and communicates that you are genuinely interested in the person across from you. Plus, most people love to talk about themselves. Your ability to ask the right questions and actually listen to the answers will speak volumes about yourself without saying a word.

             Finally, do not get out of that chair until the person you are meeting with has given you 2 to 3 more people with which to meet. In order to keep the ball rolling, you need to continually meet new people. In addition, with their permission, you can use their name as your compelling reason for meeting with your next contact, saying, “I recently met with John to learn more about the field, and he recommended I meet with you. Can I have 15 to 20 minutes of your time this week?”

             Conducting informational interviews will expand your network and help you to learn about the community and industry you are pursuing. Not to mention getting out and meeting new people will boost your morale tremendously after sitting on the couch endlessly churning out applications to no avail. But how does it help you find a job? The people you meet with will have a pulse on the local job market and will likely know of openings in the field. If not, they will know somebody who does. Even though your meetings are not about the fact that you are job searching, it will likely come up organically. Even if it does not, you can reach out to your contacts later if you see they are connected to a position you are interested in for a reference or advice on your application.

              If you are stuck in your job search, connect with people through the informational interview. Consider it a useful tool to add to your toolbox of job search skills. In my experience, limited as it may be, landing the right job really is all about who you know. The informational interview is a great way to quickly expand your network and gain some traction in what can be a difficult and discouraging job search.

CFEC Guest Blogger for Job Seekers in Central Florida:

Christopher Burke

Development Coordinator at Christian HELP Foundation, Inc.

"Do you have vague, childhood memories of milk being delivered to your door?  Can you recall when your Mom would bring your shoes to be fixed at the shoe maker on Main Street and you might get a Root Beer float at the counter at Woolworth’s afterward?  Was your older sister learning to type on an IBM Selectric so she could get that great job after she graduated high school?

Did you think when you choose your career as a young adult that you would work in that field until you retired and are now finding out that’s not quite true?  As a job-seeker over 45 years of age, loaded with experience and wisdom, are you finding it hard to get a good-paying job (or any job)?  Are you discouraged?  Then this segment is for you (honestly, it’s for everyone).

Our time together will be fun and productive.  We will explore what it takes to overcome your obstacles, how you can present your added value to a potential employer and how to effectively position yourself for a good paying job in a difficult job market through branding.  Laugh if you must, but let me ask you this: ”What brand of bottled water do you buy?”  You think about that until we meet together." 

To find out more about this great topic by Tracy E. Trimblett, Consultant join us Thursday evening, April 3, 2014 from 6-9pm for our Re-Charge and Re-Energize Your Job Search Seminar© in the fellowship hall at College Park Baptist Church 1914 Edgewater Dr., Orlando, FL 32804.

 

Guest Blogger for Job Seekers:
Tracy E. Trimblett, Consultant