Source: Ask Sandi | Seminole Voice

What if employment searches were like eHarmony where you each answer a questionnaire and come up with potential matches of who you would possibly be paired up with? No resumes, just an online profile. Interviews would be more like dates, getting to know each other.

That is what networking is all about. It is about meeting people, building relationships, and helping each other to meet your goals. I wish it was as easy as an online search, but it takes more effort than a 40-minute quiz and an online profile. (Although I do know a few people who have met their match on eHarmony.)

Back to the idea of online networking: The best place I can suggest is LinkedIn. I know I have talked about this many times before, but it still stuns me when I find out how many people have not invested the time it takes to get “connected” through LinkedIn.

I have other people who tell me they get lots of requests from Linkedin, but they are not on there. I highly recommend all professional job seekers, including passive job seekers, to put up a profile.

The process is pretty simple, just login to LinkedIn.com and follow the instructions. If you have a good resume, you can copy and paste most of the information. If you would like me to take a look at your profile once you get it online, please send me an email. I would be glad to look at it.


Guest Blogger CFEC Board Member:

sandi14  Sandi Vidal, Executive Director, Christian HELP Foundation, Inc.
  Staff Writer for Seminole Voice

Thinking about starting a job search? Need a little nudge to get going? We’re here to help. Today’s job search may be a bit more complicated than you think. There’s a lot more to it than just searching the internet for jobs and pressing a button to apply; at least there is if you want a better chance for success. So how do you get started? We will share our top 10 ideas on how to jump start your search.
In this webinar, we will outline both new and old methods for your job search. From things like traditional networking to social networking, resumes to online profiles and in-person interviews to video sessions; we’ve got you covered. A successful job search can require a lot of dedication and motivation. We will share our tips on how to make things just a little easier.

By participating in this webinar, you’ll learn:
•The importance of networking and useful tips
•About today’s interview process
•Ways to tune up your resume
•How to incorporate social media into your job search
•Why your personal brand matters


To register, visit: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/10617/106343.

BrightTALK is building professional communities around current and relevant industry and business thought leadership content. Every day thousands of thought leaders are actively sharing their insights, their ideas and their most up-to-date...

Above information was provided by CFEC Board Member and guest blogger:

World of Work Professional
Manpower Florida

(repost for upcoming job fair) By #1 Best-Selling Author and Recruiter Scott Vedder

It’s always best to customize your résumé and explain exactly how your experience has prepared you for the specific qualifications listed in a job posting.  That’s a key point I teach in my best-selling book, Signs of a Great Résumé.  But what should you do when you’re attending a job fair where you’ll meet with lots of different employers?  In a job fair setting, employers will know it’s nearly impossible for you to customize a cover letter and résumé for every single company in attendance.   To quantify what makes you a great candidate for several prospective employers, you should showcase examples of your accomplishments and skills related to the most common requirements in your field.

Before you write your job fair résumé, search for online job postings roles related to the career you’re pursuing.  Take a look at the qualifications that different companies require.  You’ll likely find some common trends and frequently used terms which appear in job postings at several different companies.  With this bit of research, you’ll be able to write a résumé that speaks for itself and a cover letter which addresses your qualifications to fulfill the most common needs of your desired career field.

Next, before going to the job fair, try to determine which companies will be represented.  Take a look at the jobs these companies already have posted on their web sites.  If there’s a specific opening for which you’d like to apply, customize a separate résumé and cover letter for that posting and bring it with you along with your job fair résumé.  If there’s not one particular opening that appeals to you, consider how that company generally evaluates prospective candidates.  What key words do they use in their job postings?  What types of skills and leadership attributes do they value?  What can you learn about their corporate culture and business priorities from their web site?  Then customize a résumé for that company with those ideas in mind.

Consider making a list of the companies you know you want to approach at the job fair and write a customized cover letter for those prospective employers.   Your cover letter should explain why you want to work for that specific company and can also indicate the general field for which you’re interested in applying.  When you submit a customized cover letter with your job fair résumé, you’ll stand out from your competition.  Remember, most other applicants, if they submit a cover letter at all, will be handing over form letters written “To Whom it May Concern,” and not to a specific employer.

In your job fair résumé and cover letters, be sure you use specific examples to quantify what makes you a great candidate in your field.  Whether you’re attending a job fair or you’re applying for a single position, your résumé should always be full of !@$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé. 

! - Any part of your experience that was "amazing!"

@ - Defining points, places, dates and things in your experience

# - Numbers that quantify and prove your past successes

$ - The dollar value of your contributions

% - Figures that easily show growth and results

When you write a résumé that’s full of !@$%, your résumé will speak for itself and you’ll be on your way to a successful job fair!

Scott Vedder is a Fortune 100 recruiter and the author of the #1 best-selling résumé book, Signs of a Great Résumé.  Scott has taught thousands of students and job seekers in résumé workshops at high schools, colleges, universities and non-profit organizations across the country.  Scott’s book has been endorsed as “Recommended Reading” by groups including the Central Florida Employment Council and the Central Florida Jobs Initiative. Scott has been recognized by the Society for Human Resource Management and has been featured as a career expert in nationally-syndicated newspaper columns, on international blogs and in dozens of live interviews on radio programs and television news.  For free résumé and interview tips, visit http://scottvedder.com/freestuff.html

Whether you’re a hiring manager, employer, looking for your next opportunity or currently employed, the talent shortage affects everyone in the U.S. workforce.

Results of ManpowerGroup’s ninth annual Talent Shortage Survey look at the extent to which employers are having difficulty finding the right talent, which jobs are the most difficult to fill, and subsequently, where you’ll find the most opportunity if you’re looking for a new job.

ManpowerGroup's Talent Shortage Survey identified the 2014 top 10 most difficult jobs for employers to fill.
1.            Skilled Trade Workers
2.            Restaurant and Hotel Staff
3.            Sales Representatives
4.            Teachers
5.            Drivers
6.            Accounting and Finance Staff
7.            Laborers
8.            IT Staff
9.            Engineers
10.          Nurses





This report was recommended by CFEC Board Member:

Lisa Hancock, Manpower

Find an office near you or search jobs with www.us.manpower.com

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             Building trades training from journey-level instructors

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Classes are available in Orange, Osceola, Lake and Seminole counties.

For more information about classes in your area contact Robert Harman at 407-607-9174 or . HBI.org

By Scott Vedder - #1 Best-Selling Author and Résumé Expert

April 13th marks the 271st birthday of Thomas Jefferson. Often called the "Father of the Declaration of Independence," Jefferson gave some fatherly advice to his granddaughter including the famous quote, "Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today."  That's also great advice for job seekers.  The best time to start writing a résumé is today.

Don't put off writing your résumé until you see your dream job posted tomorrow... or the next day, or next week!  Today is the best day to start writing a résumé full of !@#$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé

! - Any part of your experience that was “amazing!”

@ - Defining points, places, dates and things in your career

# - Numbers that quantify and prove your past successes

$ - The dollar value of your contributions

% - Figures that easily show growth and results

It is critical that you customize your résumé for each job application.  However, you can start writing your résumé today, beginning with your core skills and most significant accomplishments. Then you can customize it to directly align to the qualifications listed in each job posting.

For example, Thomas Jefferson may have started writing his Summary of Qualifications by highlighting his outstanding written and verbal communication skills.  We hold the truth that he was a great communicator to be self-evident.  And in addition to writing the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson’s résumé would surely include the fact that he spoke four or five languages!

If TJ started writing a résumé to apply for a leadership role in government land acquisition, he’d likely describe one of his most significant accomplishments, the Louisiana Purchase, using !@#$%, the Signs of a Great Résumé.  Perhaps he’d write:

"Increased the size of the continental United States by nearly 100% through the $15 million purchase of 828,000 square miles of land."

That’s certainly an “amazing!” achievement which is explained and quantified with lots of !@#$%.  If Jefferson applied for a position where the job posting also required experience negotiating international treaties he could customize the statement on his résumé to match the posting:

"Negotiated an international treaty to increase the size of the continental United States by nearly 100% through the $15 million purchase of 828,000 square miles of land."

By customizing his résumé based on the job posting and using !@#$%, Thomas Jefferson would be writing a résumé that speaks for itself.

From the early days of the militia that won the American Revolution to today's modern military, Americans have enjoyed life, liberty and a pursuit of happiness thanks in large part to the brave military men and women who have proudly served our country.  I'm sure Thomas Jefferson and all of our Founding Fathers would encourage you to support our nation's veterans.  Jefferson did his part to prepare and support our service members when he signed the Military Peace Establishment Act to create the United States Military Academy at West Point.  One way you can support our nation's military veterans today is to join our Indiegogo campaign to help 2,000 veterans, transitioning service member and military spouses get to work.  You can send deserving veterans a copy of Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition and help them find a great new job in the civilian sector.  Don’t put it off until tomorrow, contribute today.

Jefferson loved to read.  In a letter written in 1809, Jefferson said "I have often thought that nothing would do more extensive good at small expense than the establishment of a small circulating library in every county, to consist of a few well-chosen books."  I'm grateful that the Central Florida Employment Council has identified a few "well chosen" books to help job seekers and has recognized Signs of a Great Résumé and Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition as recommended reading.

In an 1815 letter to John Adams, Jefferson said "I cannot live without books."  When you write a résumé that's full of !@#$%, you'll wonder how your résumé ever lived without at least one book... Signs of a Great Résumé.

Scott Vedder is a Fortune 100 recruiter and author of the #1 best-selling book, Signs of a Great Résumé and Signs of a Great Résumé: Veterans Edition.   Scott has been recognized by the White House and Pentagon as an expert on veteran résumés.  He’s taught thousands job seekers in résumé workshops at colleges, universities, conferences, veteran service organizations, military installations and non-profits across the country.  Scott has been featured as a career expert in national and international media. For free résumé and interview tips, visit http://www.authorscottvedder.com/free-stuff-.html.

5,647 was the number of applications I had submitted online, or at least that is how many it felt like. Fresh out of college and ready to start my career, I was in a new city and felt like I was banging my head against the wall searching for a job. Surely my spray and pray application method would pay off eventually, right? I did have a college degree after all. After several months of job searching without much traction, I stumbled upon the silver bullet of the job search: the informational interview. Whether you are just starting your career, like I was, are considering a new field, or are just seeking out a job, the informational interview is a great step to succeeding in your search.

             My strategy for conducting the informational interview was four-fold. First, have a compelling reason for meeting with the person you contact. I was a recent college graduate who had just moved to the area and was interested in learning more about the local nonprofit sector. Your situation may be different than mine, but that does not mean you do not have a unique reason as to why someone should sit down with you. Maybe you are interested in learning more about a specific field or want to find out what it takes to be in your new contact’s position. Whatever it is, do not make it about the fact that you are job searching. Let that fact come out naturally. Mentioning it before you have even sat down will tie the person’s hands and make it tough to get appointments with people.

             Second, keep it short. Only ask for 15 to 20 minutes of their time and was sure to keep that promise during the meeting. If the meeting goes longer, make sure it is on their terms and not because you forgot to keep an eye on the time. People are busy, so asking for only 15 to 20 minutes of their time makes it more manageable for them and more likely that they will meet with you.

             Third, ask questions about them. Do not make it about yourself. You are there to find out more about them, their background, and the field they are in. Listening is an excellent skill to develop and communicates that you are genuinely interested in the person across from you. Plus, most people love to talk about themselves. Your ability to ask the right questions and actually listen to the answers will speak volumes about yourself without saying a word.

             Finally, do not get out of that chair until the person you are meeting with has given you 2 to 3 more people with which to meet. In order to keep the ball rolling, you need to continually meet new people. In addition, with their permission, you can use their name as your compelling reason for meeting with your next contact, saying, “I recently met with John to learn more about the field, and he recommended I meet with you. Can I have 15 to 20 minutes of your time this week?”

             Conducting informational interviews will expand your network and help you to learn about the community and industry you are pursuing. Not to mention getting out and meeting new people will boost your morale tremendously after sitting on the couch endlessly churning out applications to no avail. But how does it help you find a job? The people you meet with will have a pulse on the local job market and will likely know of openings in the field. If not, they will know somebody who does. Even though your meetings are not about the fact that you are job searching, it will likely come up organically. Even if it does not, you can reach out to your contacts later if you see they are connected to a position you are interested in for a reference or advice on your application.

              If you are stuck in your job search, connect with people through the informational interview. Consider it a useful tool to add to your toolbox of job search skills. In my experience, limited as it may be, landing the right job really is all about who you know. The informational interview is a great way to quickly expand your network and gain some traction in what can be a difficult and discouraging job search.

CFEC Guest Blogger for Job Seekers in Central Florida:

Christopher Burke

Development Coordinator at Christian HELP Foundation, Inc.

"Do you have vague, childhood memories of milk being delivered to your door?  Can you recall when your Mom would bring your shoes to be fixed at the shoe maker on Main Street and you might get a Root Beer float at the counter at Woolworth’s afterward?  Was your older sister learning to type on an IBM Selectric so she could get that great job after she graduated high school?

Did you think when you choose your career as a young adult that you would work in that field until you retired and are now finding out that’s not quite true?  As a job-seeker over 45 years of age, loaded with experience and wisdom, are you finding it hard to get a good-paying job (or any job)?  Are you discouraged?  Then this segment is for you (honestly, it’s for everyone).

Our time together will be fun and productive.  We will explore what it takes to overcome your obstacles, how you can present your added value to a potential employer and how to effectively position yourself for a good paying job in a difficult job market through branding.  Laugh if you must, but let me ask you this: ”What brand of bottled water do you buy?”  You think about that until we meet together." 

To find out more about this great topic by Tracy E. Trimblett, Consultant join us Thursday evening, April 3, 2014 from 6-9pm for our Re-Charge and Re-Energize Your Job Search Seminar© in the fellowship hall at College Park Baptist Church 1914 Edgewater Dr., Orlando, FL 32804.

 

Guest Blogger for Job Seekers:
Tracy E. Trimblett, Consultant

I was recently speaking to a local licensed mental health counselor, Cheryl Malone, M.A., about the mental struggle we all go through while looking for employment.  She stated, “Humans feel the most stress and anxiety during a cross road in their life.”  Think about it and look back in your life to some of the worst times.  Some of those times were due to events in your life that caused a cross road. What is a cross road? A cross road is a time when your life seems to be stuck or literally standing still. You feel like you don’t know what to do or that there isn’t anything moving forward. Cross roads can be mentally and physically painful. 

When you are looking for employment you are at a cross road and it’s very easy to think negatively, get depressed, and lose hope.   Every application that you submit goes into a black hole, your phone never rings, and your email inbox is empty which all has a physical and mental effect on your body and self-esteem. 

In my book, “The Recruiting Snitch, Recruiting Secrets to Help Land Your Dream Job”, I’ve provided an arsenal of tips and ideas to help get you through this time in your life. I never admit to have all the answers but I know after reading “The Recruiting Snitch” you will feel empowered to keep going and achieve the success in life that you deserve.

Please join me at the CFEC Job Search Seminar on April 3rd, 2014, to learn more about the “employment game” and secrets recruiters don’t want you to know.  I would love to meet you!

Change your circumstances today by following these tips:

1.       Stop saying, “I’m unemployed.”

Whatever you say and put in the universe will come following you. So if you keep telling people you are unemployed, guess what? You will stay unemployed. Change that sentence to, “I’m currently in transition and on a mission to find my next career.” Then guess what will happen? You are going to find your next job. I know it sounds crazy but the power of your words is beyond mighty, so begin by putting an end to sending negative words in the universe.

From here on out, only positive statements and words will be released from your lips.

2.       Stop saying, “No one is hiring.”

If no one was hiring, I would be unemployed. I’ve been a Recruiter for 10 years. This means for the past 10 years I’ve been working for companies that are hiring. I receive hundreds of emails, LinkedIn messages, and see all day companies who are hiring and looking for talent every day. So, the truth is, companies are hiring, you just aren’t holding the skills they are looking for or you are looking in the wrong places.

By using the excuse, “No one’s is hiring”, you are immediately showing your lack of research in the current economy and job market because the fact is companies are hiring everywhere. You are also sending negativity out in the universe, which again will only breed negative reactions.

So the best way to rephrase that sentence is to say, “I hold a very niche skill set so I’m currently looking for a company that can use my skills to provide me with an opportunity.”

3.       Stop sitting behind your computer.

In “The Recruiting Snitch”, I provide a detailed plan on how you should spend your days looking for employment. In summary, the first 2 weeks are heavily on the computer but then in week 3, I advise the reader to get out of the house at least 2 times per week to meet up with other people. This can be at a professional networking event (www.meetup.com), meet up with a family member, old co-worker, past teacher, professor, cousin,  friend, or just start a friendly conversation with anyone at the mall, gas station, grocery store, or library.

The fact is you have a better chance of receiving employment through a personal referral. So you need to expand your personal network as much as you can. This does NOT mean sending more friend requests on Facebook or liking more pictures on Instagram.  Have a face to face conversation and interaction with at least 2 people a week.  You may meet someone out at the library and find their cousin is a manager at the company you’ve wanted to work. That’s all it takes sometimes.

4.       Stop comparing yourself to others.

Social media has made it easy for us all to look in to everyone’s life and immediately think, “Man, they have an awesome life.” Then what do you do? You immediately think, “Gosh, my life is horrible, I wish I had what they have.” The depiction of your friend’s life is based on the pictures they chose to post, it’s an edited or Photoshoped version of their life. So of course! They post the most attractive pictures or the most exciting stories to share.   

Here’s the truth, we are all going through our own struggle and you are not in the boat alone. When you are feeling bad about your current situation say to yourself, “Everyone goes through this and I’m not alone, it may be a tough time, but I know this is just a moment in my life that isn’t fun but it will get better very soon.” See how you changed the negative to a positive?

In summary, this method of positive thinking will not come easy but it is worth the change.  Once you can start viewing this time as an adventure, a change for the better, and just a bump in the road, you will start to see little opportunities open up for you.  The universe will bring you people that will inspire and help you get to where you need to go, and you will take your life and happiness back.

If you enjoyed this reading or want to hear more, please join me at the CFEC Job Search Seminar on April 3rd, 2014. I will be speaking on recruiting secrets, how to ace the interview, networking, and resume writing. All very valuable topics if you are looking for employment.

Also, make a $15 investment in yourself and pick up a copy of “The Recruiting Snitch” at www.recruitingsnitch.com today!


In Success,

Alysse Metzler

The Recruiting Snitch

Job-readiness training program - no cost to you!  In case you didn't know, we have a complimentary job seeker class through our Central Florida Jobs Initiative program which equips and empowers job seekers to become excellent employees. Professional, mid, and entry level job seekers are welcome! We have classes starting often, but sign ups for the next class are ending this week.  If you are job seeking or know someone who is, then please share - sign up quick!

Participants are guaranteed job placement assistance upon successful completion of the program.

 

More Information or to sign up for the next session 

 

  

 

Some say that after 55 (I’m 66!!) you are “set out to pasture” to graze for the rest of your life.  I take issue with that.  The question really is what’s in that pasture?

I see a pasture with 3 distinct sections.  Section one has an abundance of grass.  The “Senior Citizens” (SC) there are grazing to their hearts content, loving it.  They are making money, they are relaxing doing what they really want to do and don’t care what their age is.

The second section of the pasture is sparse.  There is some grass and the SC who have “settled” there are complaining that there is some grass there, but they want more.  They are working on a “Plan B” because during their prime (before they were set out to pasture) they were making a salary and loving it.  Now they have to work, and work harder so that they can eventually meander over to “Section one” where there’s an abundance of grass.

The third section is sandy.  It has no grass.  There are a few SC over there, but they are constantly complaining that there is absolutely nothing out there (do I hear apathy?).  They have worked hard and now they are standing there trying to find SOME grass to graze on, but they are just not finding it.  They are not prepared for this eventuality.  They have been given advice by dozens of people and have opted to take the wrong advice as those people didn’t have a clue as to what they were talking about but felt comfortable just  “giving advice”.  These are people who are “doubting Toms”.

Now, let’s revisit that second area.  What led them to the path where there is some grass?  Preparation?  Great advice from those “in the know”?  Networking with the right people?  A high quality resume and LinkedIn profile?  The answer of course is yes to all the above.  Will they (or can they) meander quickly to the dense grassy area and make something of their life?  The answer is a definite YES. 

Preparation is the key word.  There is no genetic or DNA issue here.  There is no magic formula.  There is no large bank account.  There is no large “silver spoon”.  It takes hard work to get to that middle patch.  Yes, we all want to be in the far left grassy patch (Section one).  We can do it….won’t happen overnight….it may never happen, but we can’t say we didn’t try.  We all went to bed those nights saying, “we did the best we could all day and into the night.  We are being paid what we are worth. We are not being paid what others feel we are worth.    If we took a tablet and put two columns, we’d see something like the following:

Plan A (a paid position) Versus Plan B – The alternative

Plan A – The job we love to hate or hate to love

Plan B – I’ll do my own thing and make the best of it

A paycheck each week

A commission check saying this is what you accomplished


The boss tells me what hours I must work

 
I work the hours I must work to make some money


You are assigned to work on a team full of like skills and you must work as a team or be told you are changing teams


You are working independently or your team mates (aka downline) are doing their best under your guidance


You must be available evenings or weekends when assigned by your boss


You work whatever hours it takes to get the job done

 This chart depicts the difference between working for someone and working for yourself.  As the “new crop of senior citizens, we all want to have a weekly pay check.  We all want to have our bills paid on time.   We want all stores to have “senior discounts”.  This is a new age for us.  We are used to working in our comfort zones, that “box “ called 1980 when we saw life a lot easier. 

Newsflash, this is the 21st century and we are (by our own admission) BabyBoomers or “Boomers” for short.  We were born post WWII.  We didn’t have a choice!!!  Now we have children and grandchildren.  We are in the same or similar boat that our grandparents and parents may have been  in during the 60’s and 70’s.  Only the economy IS NOT the same.  It is terribly different.

A
re your skills where they should be?  Should you go to school to update those skills?  There is a mountain of questions to be asked and, yes, answered.  Should you seek help?  A resounding YES is in order here.  What kind of help should you seek?  Help comes from those who either “have been there” or from those who ARE there and are struggling just like you.  The word NETWORKING comes to mind.  These could be your peers and (yes) even your competition. 

The biggest selling point YOU have is YOU.  That’s right.  Walk up to someone and smile.  Stand on a street corner and look up.  How many will stop and look up right beside you?  Your “soft” skills are just as important as your “hard “skills.  Soft skills are that grin or smile you always display.  That sense of humor.  Having “people skills” is over used. 

The next selling point is your resume.  Does it tell the whole story?  Although I am an expert resume writer, I will not sit here and tell you to meet with me.  This is not my time to self-promote.  I will say this though, and that is that your resume is not an android.  YOU are not an android!    There are rules and rules governing how a resume should be written.  I am not going to expound on ANY of them at this point.  I will say, however, that if you talk to 12 different people, you are going to get 12 DIFFERENT ANSWERS.  Some may be the same, some will be different.  Who makes the decision ultimately?  You do!!! 

The last selling point is your LinkedIn Profile.  It MUST match your resume.  Again, I am not going to promote my seminars, aside to say that they deal with creating a polished LinkedIn Profile.  If you don’t promote yourself….no one else will.  Remember, if it is to be, it’s up to me.  If you don’t self-promote, someone else will and that person (could be a good friend in the same field) will get the position before you do!!  So you ask, “What’s in it for me”.  Plenty….a job or new position for starters.

Being “put out to pasture” is no fun.  No matter what section of the pasture you end up being in.  Growing up and getting gray, is (hopefully) a time that we are all looking forward to.  Better we are vertical than horizontal.  We read obituaries every day about those in their 60’s who opted to take their own life because they admitted to being (in their own view) losers. 

I heard the statement, “God didn’t make junk”.  We need to regroup, realize that we have peers and we have support groups who exist simply to help.  Are you taking advantage of them?  Leaders of these groups can “lead you to the trough” but we can’t make you drink.

You have to do your part.  What is your part?  Simple, don’t stay in “Section three”.  Meander over to the sparse grass and get used to it for a while.  Build and keep building.  Then, after you’ve built, meander over to the dense grass and START EATING.  After all, we are “boomers” and we are what we make of ourselves.  Plan B DOES exist.  Will you use it?  Or will you simply stay by the fence and watch others go for success?

Written by one of CFEC's Guest Bloggers:

Howie Appel, Executive Director
ProNet Career Resources | Keeping Local Professionals Local!